How to Cook Easy Peel Hard-Boiled Eggs

Once I figured out the secrets to easy peel hard-boiled eggs…well, let’s just say that I make hard-boiled eggs a lot more. There are so many great uses.

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Past Issues with Hard-Boiled Eggs

For years, I struggled with peeling hard-boiled eggs.

I struggled so much, that I rarely wanted to make them. That was too bad too, because I love eggs. Whether they are deviled eggs, egg salad, or in potato salad.

However, when you struggle with peeling the eggs, these recipes are not very fun to make.

Somehow, it seems eggs should be easy to make! That was not always the case for me. When I would peel the eggs, it seemed that I would end up with about Β½ the egg left after peeling. Because I mangled the egg and the shell just trying to get the egg peeled! Seriously frustrating. Another thing that I struggled with is the grey ring that will often form on the edge of the egg yolk. While I do not think it changes the taste of the hard-boiled egg, it just does not look very nice. When you are making a nice dish to pass at a party, you want the eggs to look and taste great.

Finding Success in Cooking and Peeling Eggs!

Just look at those beautiful eggs. It is just a thing of beauty. You can have eggs just like these too.

Bowl of Peeled Eggs
Bowl of Peeled Eggs

Changing When I Peeled the Eggs

One day, I was in a hurry, I cooled the eggs quickly with cool water and started peeling them when they were just cool enough for me to handle. The shells almost fell off! I accidentally found a new trick.

Changing How I Cooked the Eggs

Then a few years later, I decided to cook the eggs in a covered kettle versus a small pot that barely held the eggs.

I covered the kettle and only used about an inch of water. I bring the water to a boil and let the eggs boil for 5 minutes. Then I keep the cover on the kettle and let it sit for 10 minutes. Once done, I put the kettle in the sink and slowly start to add cool water. When the eggs are cool enough to touch, I begin peeling the eggs. The result was perfectly cooked hard-boiled eggs that peel easy.

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Works Every Time!

I am sure that there is a scientific reason for why this works, but I don’t have a clue why this works. This is the method that I use all the time to make my hard-boiled eggs and it works every time. Making and peeling hard-boiled eggs is no longer a dreaded task.

Not Only Easy Peel, But No Grey Ring Around the Yolk

Hard-Boiled Eggs Cut Open
Hard-Boiled Eggs Cut Open

Just Look at the Large Peelings and Perfect Eggs

Notice the large chunks? Not small pieces with all the egg white still stuck to them? Love it!

Egg Shells
Egg Shells
Easy peel hard-boiled egg
Easy peel hard-boiled egg
Make Sure to Check out the Deviled Eggs Recipe too.
Deviled Eggs 1
Deviled Eggs Recipe

Print Recipe
How to Cook Easy Peel Hard-Boiled Eggs Yum
How to Cook Easy Peel Hard-Boiled Eggs
Course Breakfast, Snack
Cuisine American
Keyword recipe
Prep Time 0
Cook Time 8 minutes
Servings
eggs
Ingredients
  • water Enough water for approximately 1 inch in the kettle
  • eggs as many as you want-I often do a dozen at once
Course Breakfast, Snack
Cuisine American
Keyword recipe
Prep Time 0
Cook Time 8 minutes
Servings
eggs
Ingredients
  • water Enough water for approximately 1 inch in the kettle
  • eggs as many as you want-I often do a dozen at once
How to Cook Easy Peel Hard-Boiled Eggs
Instructions
  1. Using a kettle, place eggs inside and cover with approximately 1 inch of water. Place lid on top. Bring to a boil, which does not take long with this little of water. Once boiling, boil for 5 minutes. Then turn off heat and let kettle sit with the lid on for 10 minutes.
    Eggs in Kettle
  2. After the eggs have sat for 10 minutes. Bring the kettle to the sink and start running cool water on the eggs (leaving the hot water in the kettle). This keeps the eggs from cooling down too fast.
    Running cool water on eggs
  3. Once the eggs are cool enough to handle, start peeling the eggs. Take an egg and tap it all around lightly against the sink or the counter. This will help crack the shell for easier peeling. Don't crack too much or the shell will not come off in large chunks which is part of what makes the peeling so easy.
    Easy peel hard-boiled egg
  4. This is a pile of egg shell peelings. Notice that I am peeling them on a plastic bag from a store. This makes for easy clean up. Also, notice the large chunks of the egg peelings.
    Egg Shells
  5. This bowl of eggs all turned just fine and it only took minutes to peel. I think with the cooking and peeling it all took less than 30 minutes.
    Peeled Hard-Boiled Eggs
  6. This is an egg cut open. Notice how there is no grey ring around the yolk? Now, if you refrigerate it for a day or so, you might get a grey ring, but serving it the same day. I don't have any problem.
    Hard-Boiled Eggs Cut Open
Recipe Notes

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Here are a few other recipes you may enjoy making. Come check them out.


Breakfast Recipes Β 

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18 thoughts on “How to Cook Easy Peel Hard-Boiled Eggs”

  1. Thanks for sharing your accidental secret with us! I didn’t think about boiling the eggs in a kettle for a shorter time and letting the steam finish cooking it. It makes sense why the boiled eggs that chinese street vendors sell are pretty. They use this massive steamer thing to steam sweet potatoes, eggs, and dumplings. Great post!

  2. Thanks for the cooking tip! Is the magic in the cold water after cooking? I have the issue of the shells being stuck to the egg, so I’m going to follow your instructions to a T. Thanks again πŸ™‚

    1. I think that the steam somehow does a better job of cooking the eggs through. Then by letting them stay covered for the 10 minutes, they finish cooking. Or, maybe it is the cooling down quickly and peeling right away. There must be a scientific reason…I haven’t a clue. Enjoy!

  3. I cannot wait to put this to the test! We eat A LOT of hard boiled eggs in our house because we are eating low carb. I’ve noticed that it’s usually easier to peel when they are still pretty hot and I need to run cold water over them to keep from burning my hands. However, I still have problems at least 50% of the time, so I’m excited to try cooking them with less water in a covered kettle.

  4. I love this post! One of my family’s favorite dishes is Deviled Eggs. I usually do 2 dozen. I haven’t been using any consistent method of peeling, and about half the time I curse the whole time I am peeling! I wonder if it has anything to do with the cooking method? I use the old Julia Child (and Egg Board) method. Cold water an inch over the eggs, bring to a boil, boil one minute, cover and set aside for 13 minutes. The eggs are perfectly cooked.
    Thank you; I am going to discipline myself to try this method going forward.

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